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Slices of candy cane beet

Cod with candy cane beet salad

December 28th, 2018 | main dishes

Candy cane beet is always a guarantee for a colorful plate. So just right for the cloudy season. In combination with lamb’s lettuce, radish and crispy cinnamon croutons, this winter salad is a delicious addition to roast codfish.

Cod with candy cane beet salad

In German the candy cane beet is called something like ring stripe beet [Ringelbete]. I guess the English name fits better. Actually obvious, this vegetable looks like a candy cane. Who believes that the red-white-curled, small turnip is a breeding of modern times, is wrong. The original form of the candy cane beet was already known in 2000 b. C. Through breeding in the 19th and 20th centuries, the beautiful ring stripes got lost. This is how the today’s common beetroot came into being. How good that the old varieties revive!

Codfish with candy cane beet salad

(4 portions)

2 slices of stale bread
remove the bread crust and cut into small cubes
50 g of butter, melted
1 ts of sugar
1 pinch of cinnamon
salt
stir, mix with the bread cubes, bake on a baking tray lined with baking paper at 180° C for about 15-18 minutes until crispy and golden brown
300 g white radish
400 g candy cane beet
cut into very thin slices on the cucumber slicer
sugar, salt
lightly sugar and salt the beet and radish, allow to steep for 15 minutes, then pat dry with kitchen paper
4 TS white balsamic
1 TS agave syrup
½ ts salt, pepper from the mill
grated peel of ½ organic lemon
2 TS safflower oil
5-6 TS mineral water
whisk to a dressing
about 120 grams of lamb’s lettuce
arrange lamb’s lettuce, candy cane beet and radish on a plate
½ bunch chives, finely cut
drizzle dressing over the salad, garnish with chives and croutons
800 g of cod loins
salt pepper
a splash of lemon juice
some flour
season codfish, roll in a little flour, tap off excess flour
clarified butter
fry in hot fat until golden brown and serve with the salad

AND THIS IS HOW THE WIFE OF THE CAPTAIN DOES IT

I use clarified butter for frying fish or some other oil that can be heated to high temperature, as rapeseed oil (olive oil is rather unsuitable for searing due to its low smoke point). It is important to put plenty of fat in the pan. Then you get a nice crust and the fish does not fall apart.

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