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Hazelnuts in and in front of a basket for my nut bread recipe

A nut bread recipe and how I became a hazelnut godmother

March 13th, 2020 | bread & pastries

I recently saw a report on child labor during the hazelnut harvest in Turkey. The post made me sad. But is there an alternative? Hazelnuts grown in Germany? I looked around and found what I was looking for: at the gates of Berlin on the Windkind farm with David and Silvia.

A nut bread recipe and how I became a hazelnut godmother

[This post contains advertising]

70% of all hazelnuts worldwide are actually produced in Turkey. Migrant workers work there under the most unworthy conditions. Whole families get on the nut farms and work eleven to twelve hours a day for an hourly wage of one (1!) Euro. Children are not allowed to go to school during the harvest months.

I immediately went to the kitchen to see where the (organic) hazelnuts in my pantry come from: from Turkey. And under what conditions are organic nuts grown and harvested there? And how do I now bake my nut bread?

My research showed that hazelnuts are imported almost exclusively in Germany. Nearly. On the Windkind farm north of Berlin, in the Löwenberger Land community near Oranienburg, walnuts and hazelnuts are grown, “organic-vegan, fair, social and plastic-free”.

And what, please, shouldn’t be vegan with a hazelnut? David from the Windkind Hof explained it to me: “The nut itself is of course vegan. However, fruit and vegetable cultivation is rarely produced outside the cycle of livestock farming. Anyone who keeps farm animals must of course also feed the excrement back into the ground. We don’t do that. We only fertilize our green paradise with vegetable material. With grass, wild herbs, leaves and straw. Products of animal origin, such as liquid manure, horn meal, blood meal etc., are also out of  question for us. ”

To be honest, vegan is not the decisive criterion for me, but that David and Silvia cultivate a 100% sustainable product with low water consumption, high biodiversity and fair working conditions – I think that’s great (and for my CO2 karma it is also good if these nuts come from Germany instead of from Turkey).

But it gets even better: You can sponsor a walnut or hazelnut tree. As a tree sponsor, you get your harvest share of either eight kilograms of walnuts or four kilograms of hazelnuts a year, and by the way you support a social project in Senegal and Gambia. I can only say: The price for a sponsorship is very fair and you never commit for more than a year. And you can even visit your sponsored tree.

My first nut package has already arrived and our daughter and I have – quite meditatively – cracked the first 500 g of hazelnut kernels. It is a bit like peeling brown shrimp and is fun for two or in a group – you can have a nice chat… How much hazelnut kernel did we will have gained from the four kilos in the end? I will report, when we are done. Now let’s start with my nut bread recipe with wonderful aromatic and crunchy hazelnuts from the Windkind farm – completely organic-vegan, fair, social and plastic-free.

Oh, and one more thing: A tree sponsorship is also a really nice gift idea for a wedding, birthday, anniversary – really something very special, and so delicious!

nut bread

(Attention: allow the batter to rise overnight – preheat the oven to 220° C)

¼ cube of yeast (approx. 10 g)
dissolve the yeast in 250 ml of cold water in a mixing bowl
250 g whole grain spelt flour
stir in, cover the dough with cling film and put in the fridge overnight
¼ cube of yeast (approx. 10 g)
dissolve in 100 ml of cold water
250 g whole grain spelt flour
100 - 150 g hazelnuts
2 level ts of salt
1 ts of bread spice
add the dissolved yeast and all other ingredients to the pre-dough and knead well with the dough hook, cover the bowl with a kitchen towel and let the dough rise at room temperature for 15 minutes
grease a loaf pan (approx. 30 cm), knead the dough briefly on a little flour and put it in the loaf pan, leave covered for another 45 minutes at room temperature
place a heat-resistant bowl of hot water on the oven floor, slide the loaf pan onto the bottom rail in the preheated oven, reduce the temperature to 180° C after 10 minutes, remove the water bowl and bake for about 30 minutes
take the bread out of the oven, let it cool briefly, then remove it from the pan and let cool on a wire rack

 

A note on transparency:

This post contains advertising.
The content and my opinion were not affected. The hazelnuts are just awesome!

Further information:

www.trusted-blogs.com/werbekennzeichnung

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