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Monkfish ragout with vermouth sauce

Monkfish ragout with vermouth sauce

December 15th, 2019 | main dishes

A pan full of flavors and enjoyment! In this French dish, the monkfish is prepared with garlic, tomatoes and crème fraîche. The monkfish ragout with vermouth sauce needs only 30 minutes to prepare – and yet is so classy and delicious.

Monkfish ragout with vermouth sauce

Monkfish is characterized by its firm flesh, which tastes a bit like lobster. Monkfish is the ideal cast for a ragout, as it keeps its shape when simmering in the sauce and does not crumble. Catfish or seawolf fillet is also very suitable for this ragout. Please put this back in the sauce at the very end and heat without stirring, because otherwise the rather firm meat will crumble in the end.

A green leaf salad and baguette, even better roasted garlic baguette are suitable as a side dish. Therefore, brush the bread slices with a little olive oil, roast them on the grill or in the pan and rub the crisp slices with a halved clove of garlic.

Monkfish ragout with vermouth sauce

(4 servings)

600 - 800 g monkfish, cut into large pieces
6 TS of olive oil
heat the oil to a high temperature and fry half of the fish cubes for about 2 minutes, remove from the pan, keep warm and do the same with the rest of the monkfish, reduce heat
2 onions, finely chopped
3 - 4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
steam in the roast until glazed (do not let it brown), raise the temperature
200 ml white, dry vermouth (e.g. Noilly Prat)
add to the onions, deglaze
800 g tomatoes, diced finely (alternatively: canned tomatoes in cubes)
also put in the pan, simmer
5 sprigs of tarragon
add 4 tarragon sprigs to the sauce
1 organic lemon
rub the lemon peel into the pan, simmer together for about 10 minutes, reduce heat
3 - 4 TS crème fraîche
stir into the sauce, then put the fish back into the pan and let it gently simmer for another 5 minutes
serve garnished with the remaining tarragon

Alternative with catfish or seawolf

Alternative preparation: Instead of monkfish, I used catfish fillet and instead of fresh tomatoes (which are not so aromatic in winter anyway) canned organic cherry tomatoes. A 2017 Siefersheimer Chardonnay from our favorite winery Oswald from Wahlheim in Rheinhessen fits perfectly. The Chardonnay matured in barrels harmonizes wonderfully with the intense aromas of tarragon, tomato and vermouth.

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